The New Zealand Tourism Research Institute at The Auckland University of Technology brings together experts from around the world to deliver innovative research solutions for the industry and those who depend on it. Our research enables business, community and government to develop profitable and sustainable industry outcomes. The institute is a recognised leader in graduate student research and education, with many alumni in key international academic and industry positions.

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Touching the intangible - a journey through the assessment of socio-cultural and economic factors in tourism policy and research

Presenter: 
Massimo Morellato
Date: 
11 December, 2015 12:00
Location: 
WH125, WH Building, AUT City Campus

This seminar will give a brief overview of Massimo’s work on the assessment of intangible assets and positive legacies for community development stimulated by events and leisure.  In Europe, as well as North America and South Pacific, communities are comprised of dynamic adaptive systems influenced by social-economic and ecological factors. They require an effective human and community capacity which can respond to rapidly changing market conditions, mitigate conflicts, and adapt to emerging circumstances, whilst preserving or strengthening the identity of the destination.

Experience matters - the influence of tourist experiences on travel behaviour and challenges for strategic destination management

Presenter: 
Sabrina Seeler, Lecturer - Tourism & Events, School of Hospitality and Tourism, AUT University
Date: 
4 December, 2015 12:00
Location: 
WH125, WH Building, AUT City Campus

Experience matters! This is the starting point for this research which hypothesises that the tourist’s individual experiences influence future travel behaviour and cause changes in demand. While the global demand in tourism keeps growing, the number of accessible and interchangeable destinations increases, markets are saturated and product and destination-life cycles shortened. Destinations are considered the core of the complex tourism product and are hence not only exposed to changes in consumer needs and behaviour but also an intensified competitive environment. To stay competitive in the long-term, tourist destinations need new strategies to meet these challenges.

A multi-level analysis on Leader-Member relationship differentiation in the hospitality industry

Presenter: 
Pola Wang, Lecturer - Hospitality School of Hospitality and Tourism, PhD Candidate
Date: 
6 November, 2015 12:00
Location: 
WH125

This research investigates the role of work relationship and non-work relationship between leaders and their team members in a group environment, and how it affects employees’ work attitude and behaviour in the Chinese hospitality industry. The perceived fairness of leadership is the focus of the project and is analysed through the evaluation of any differentiation among the perceived leader-member relationship. This research seeks to expand the traditional leader-member exchange framework by adopting the concept of non-work relationship that originates from the philosophy of Confucianism and prevails among cultures with high level of collectivism.

 

Visitor monitoring in coastal and marine areas – some experiences and critical reflections from Sweden

Presenter: 
Andreas Skriver Hansen
Date: 
9 October, 2015 12:00
Location: 
WH417, WH Building, AUT Wellesley Campus

The presentation will be a small introduction to Andreas’s PhD work, which concerns a better understanding of the role and importance of visitor monitoring in the management of coastal and marine areas. This is a topic that has eluded attention both in academic circles and in management practices – in spite of its importance for correct management of coastal and marine areas. To address this issue, the main focus of Andreas’s research is to examine the conditions for developing and professionalizing visitor monitoring procedures in coastal and marine areas, both in Sweden and internationally. In the presentation, Andreas will introduce two papers that he is currently working on.

What makes a successful hospitality graduate? Key stakeholder perspectives

Presenter: 
Stephen Cox, Lecturer, School of Hospitality and Tourism, AUT University
Date: 
25 September, 2015 12:00
Location: 
WH417, WH Building, AUT Wellesley Campus

The research explored the range of skills, qualities, competencies and intelligences that establish predictors of success for the hospitality industry, framed by three main research questions: 1) how is success in hospitality understood and measured? 2) what factors are perceived as critical for success in hospitality? and 3) what is the role and contribution of hospitality higher education in the development of successful hospitality graduates?  The study adopted a constructivist-interpretivist approach to the investigation and evaluation of hospitality stakeholder perspectives, using the case of AUT staff and students, combined with industry representatives in an Auckland setting.

The role of stakeholder collaboration in sustainable tourism competitiveness: the case of Auckland, New Zealand

Presenter: 
Amira Fathimath
Date: 
14 September, 2015 12:00
Location: 
WH417

The success of the tourism industry is reliant on the efforts of all the stakeholders that contribute to creating the total tourism product and experience. This makes stakeholder collaboration an essential part of achieving and sustaining tourism competitiveness. Collaboration has proved to be particularly challenging in amalgamated cities. Using the case of the recently amalgamated Auckland ‘Supercity’, this research explores the role of stakeholder collaboration in sustainable tourism competitiveness within Auckland’s tourism industry.

Māori Spaces in Foreign Places - Hinemihi o Te Ao Tawhito

Presenter: 
Keri-Anne Wikitera, Lecturer, School of Hospitality and Tourism, AUT University. NZTRI PhD Candidate
Date: 
10 September, 2015 12:00
Location: 
WH125, WH Building, AUT City Campus

The whare tūpuna (ancestral meeting house) Hinemihi o te Ao Tawhito, built in 1881 in Te Wairoa, Aotearoa (New Zealand), is now located in Surrey, England. Despite radical changes in cultural, social, economic and geographic landscapes over the past 128 years, the whare continues to epitomise a distinct Māori cultural identity. How Hinemihi has managed to sustain this cultural identity despite its geographic dislocation from her homeland is the focus of this study.

Cancelled: Protecting Beach Visitors: Understanding Risk Perceptions and Precautionary Behaviour

Presenter: 
Brent W. Ritchie, Associate Professor, Tourism Group, University of Queensland Business School
Date: 
13 August, 2015 14:00
Location: 
WH417

Due to unforseen circumstances, this seminar has been cancelled. The presentation slides are attached. We hope to reschedule the seminar at some point in the future.

 

Visiting beaches are one of the most popular activities among international and domestic visitors, but beaches pose potential hazards inside and outside of the water. This is especially the case for visitors who may lack knowledge surrounding risks and how to protect themselves, making them more vulnerable. Sixty-one people drowned in New Zealand during the first six months of 2015, a 30 percent increase on 2014 with fifteen people dying at beaches, up from just six in 2014. In Australia many water/beach safety organisations and local councils have invested considerable effort to communicate risks to beach visitors, but 84 drowning deaths were recorded in coastal areas in 2013-2014. Most were due to swimming/wading, while visitors living greater than 50 km from the coast represented 53% of beach drowning deaths in 2013-2014 with more than 70.0% of Queensland drowning deaths recorded by visitors.

Migrant Community Participation in a Mega Sporting Event: New Zealand Chinese and the Rugby World Cup 2011

Presenter: 
Chloe Lau, Instructor and Programme Leader (BAC Xi'an), School of Hotel and Tourism Management, Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Date: 
19 June, 2015 12:00
Location: 
WH125

As the largest event ever staged in New Zealand, the nation’s Government believed that the Rugby World Cup (RWC) 2011 would generate economic, cultural and social benefits for the host population. Building social cohesion by engaging New Zealanders in the event was one of the four major event goals. However, the event’s “uniquely New Zealand” thumbprint slogan may create doubts of national identity for some members in the local ethnic communities who are not devotees of rugby. This case study of the Chinese migrant community in Auckland explores the relationships inherent in their participation: their awareness of the event and its connection to participation, economic links, and identity and pride.

APacCHRIE 2015 - New Zealand Tourism 2025 Challenges to Growing Value Together

On Thursday 11th June, Simon Milne presented the keynote titled 'New Zealand Tourism 2025: Challenges to Growing Value Together' at APacCHRIE 2015.

 

The presentation slides are available here (.PDF)

 

You can also view a video of his previous keynote at Forum Turistic 2015 here

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