The New Zealand Tourism Research Institute at The Auckland University of Technology brings together experts from around the world to deliver innovative research solutions for the industry and those who depend on it. Our research enables business, community and government to develop profitable and sustainable industry outcomes. The institute is a recognised leader in graduate student research and education, with many alumni in key international academic and industry positions.

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Audience Research at the Auckland Museum

Presenter: 
Jo Brehaut, Manager of Visitor and Market Research, Auckland War Memorial Museum
Date: 
31 October, 2014 12:00
Location: 
WH125

Audience Research in Museums has become an established discipline in its own right. It is called many things and takes various forms in different institutions including the monitoring of visitation and related KPIs, profiling and understanding visitors, and evaluating exhibitions, programmes and marketing. World- class Audience Research goes further than just monitoring and reporting attendance and satisfaction metrics however, it works to understand how well the Museum is serving the people for whom it exists, identifies barriers to engagement and works across the organisation to help remove these.

Drinking Stars

Presenter: 
Cameron J Douglas MS, Senior Lecturer, School of Hospitality and Tourism, AUT University
Date: 
17 October, 2014 14:00
Location: 
WH307 - Please RSVP - limited spaces

The modern era of New Zealand wine began a short forty years ago when Sauvignon Blanc from Marlborough exploded onto the world wine stage - capturing the attention of wine critics in London and subsequently around the globe. In 2014 Sauvignon Blanc still commands first place in terms of plantings, exports and sales. Recently however New Zealand grown Pinot Noir and Syrah have also gained the attention of critics. There is one other wine style that has slowly yet surely garnered respect and attention from these same critics - bottled fermented sparkling wine - Methode Traditionnelle.

The Future of Food Festivals: A Scenario Analysis of Wellington's Future

Presenter: 
Dr Ian Yeoman (on behalf of the Future Festival Studies Team)
Date: 
21 October, 2014 01:00
Location: 
WH417

Food is an important tourist attraction, and food and tourism have a close symbiotic relationship. Local food can play a central role in tourism products, whether it is the Hokitika Wild Food Festival or Toast Martinborough. Wellington on a Plate is portrayed as the country’s number one food festival, but in this world of change and competition what is the future for Wellington as a food festival destination? In order to understand the future, four scenario's were constructed to represent the future of international culinary food festivals across the world. Dr Spock's Food Festival; Roots La Natura and Royal Appetite all represent different forms of futures from a prognosis view to a visionary view.

Authenticity and Tourism in Kazakhstan: Neo-nomadic Culture in the Post-Soviet Era

Presenter: 
Guillaume Tiberghien
Date: 
26 September, 2014 12:00
Location: 
WH125

This PhD research investigates the perception of authenticity in Kazakhstani tourism practices through the lenses of visitors, community members, policymakers and tourism developers involved in the development of eco-cultural tours. Using a grounded theory methodology, the thesis explores new directions in which to apply the concept of authenticity in eco-cultural tourism and makes important contributions to current debates in the authenticity literature about various stakeholders’ perceptions of authenticity.

Cruising for Dollars: Development of International Cruise Tourism - Implications for New Zealand

Presenter: 
Professor Ross A. Klein
Date: 
27 August, 2014 12:00
Location: 
WH417, WH Building, AUT Wellesley Campus

This seminar will look at the development of cruise tourism from its earliest beginnings in the Caribbean through its expansion worldwide. As the industry has grown, the product has diversified and cruise itineraries have expanded to all corners of the world. While New Zealand has seen exponential growth over the past decade, it is in some ways tied to the development of cruise offerings in Australia. Continued growth also depends on competition near and far.

 

Tourism 2025 - Growing Value Together

Presenter: 
Steve Riley, Industry and Data Analyst, Tourism Industry Association NZ
Date: 
6 June, 2014 12:00
Location: 
WH125

Tourism 2025 – Growing Value Together/Whakatipu Uara Ngatahi is a framework to unite New Zealand’s large and diverse tourism industry and ignite strong, aspirational economic growth. Its goal is to have the tourism industry contribute $41 billion a year to the New Zealand economy by 2025, up from $24 billion now. It provides vital context for some collective actions by big or small industry clusters and for thousands of actions which individual businesses will take each year.

Manukau Harbour researchers keen to hear from locals

Tourism researchers exploring the recreation and tourism potential of the Manukau Harbour want to hear from as many locals and visitors as possible about the way they use the harbour.

Sustainable Tourism: Guiding Fiction or Wishful Fantasy?

Presenter: 
Richard Butler, Emeritus Professor of Tourism, Strathclyde Business School, Glasgow
Date: 
14 March, 2014 12:00
Location: 
WH126, AUT Wellersley Campus

 

Abstract:

Tourism, ICT and Community Development: Enhancing experiences, strengthening economies

Professor Simon Milne (Director NZTRI) will give a presentation as part of the 2013 Vice-Chancellor’s Lecture Series at the University of Auckland.  The theme of the four lectures in the series is: The Internet: Today and the Future.

Date: Thursday 10 October, 7-8pm
Location: Large Chemistry Lecture Theatre, Ground Floor, Chemistry Building, 23 Symonds Street (City Campus). University of Auckland.

The Economic and Conservation Value of Bird-watching in New Zealand

Presenter: 
Krisztian Vas
Date: 
4 October, 2013 12:00
Location: 
12- 1 pm, WH125, WH Building, AUT Wellesley Campus

The Economic and Conservation Value of Bird-watching in New Zealand.

 

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